Category Archives: Uncategorized

NALA invited to speak at the OECD conference

We were delighted to accept an invitation from the OECD to speak about plain language at its October conference on ‘Providing facts where opinions are formed‘. The conference will be held in Paris next week (5 and 6 October).

We see this invitation as an acknowledgement of our work with clients of our plain English service. Our clients are committed to improving the clarity of their documents for all readers.

Thank you to all those who support our work to promote clear and ethical communications.

Very informative PLAIN’s 2017 conference

NALA attended and spoke at PLAIN’s 2017 conference in September in Austria. The conference had an excellent programme and we will post a link to the presentations when they are available. The Irish Cancer Society also presented at this conference and their presentation was also excellent.

The conference showed that plain language is increasingly being used across governments and its agencies and that more and more users are tracking its effectiveness. Many presenters showed us statistics on how their efforts in plain language has reduced errors, increased profits and customer satisfaction levels.

If you are taking part in a plain English initiative, please talk to us about how best to evaluate its effectiveness. It can be easy, and it would show evidence of effectiveness in the Irish context.

 

Plain English Training 12 June

12 June 2017, 9:30am to 3:30pm
Carmelite Centre, Aungier Street, Dublin 2

Register online for a course that will introduce you to plain English writing and design tips.

Cost 
€120 per person (€100 per person for community and voluntary organisations)

The training venue is wheelchair accessible.

EirGrid wins Plain English Awards

The winners of the Plain English Awards for Ireland, sponsored by Mason Hayes & Curran were announced by the National Adult Literacy Agency in Dublin in February 2017.

The winners were:
Organisation: EirGrid
Document: Have your say – how we develop the electricity grid, and how you can influence our plans
Category: Energy category and Overall winner

Organisation: Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions
Document: Going to court as a witness
Category: Information for the public

Organisation: Down Syndrome Ireland
Document: Employment letter and survey
Category: Health-Patient tools and resources

Organisation: Pavee Point Traveller and Roma Centre and the Marie Keating Foundation
Document: Be Breast Cancer Aware
Category: Health Information for the public

Organisation: Irish Lung Fibrosis Association
Document: National Patient Charter
Category: Patient information leaflets

Organisation: Taxback.com
Document: Guide to the PAYE tax system
Category: Finance

Organisation: Bord Gáis
Document: Tone of Voice Resource
Category: Internal Resources

Organisation: The Heartbeat Trust
Document: Poster about the main symptoms of heart failure
Category: Health Posters and Bookmarks

The aim of the Plain English Awards is to reward organisations that communicate clearly in plain English. Organisations entered the competition by submitting documents that they thought were outstanding examples of plain English and an independent panel of plain English experts judged the entries.

The independent judges were very impressed with how all the winners communicated directly to the intended reader through language that was easy to read and understand.

The Plain English Awards are organised by the National Adult Literacy Agency and sponsored by leading law firm Mason Hayes & Curran. The Awards were presented at a gala dinner in the Law Society of Ireland, Dublin.

 

New booklet shows how unclear communication can lead to costly court cases

 

A new booklet called ‘Plain English and the law: the legal consequences of clear and unclear communication’ was launched on Thursday 9 February 2017. The booklet shows how plain English can save companies time and money by avoiding unnecessary legal costs. It is a joint initiative by the National Adult Literacy Agency and Mason Hayes & Curran.
The booklet presents ‘lessons’ from three Irish legal cases where the interpretation of language was central to the outcome of the court case. Two of the legal case studies show how unclear language was argued in court. A third legal case study shows how a case was won because it was proven that a company had provided clear information to a consumer.

The court cases and lessons are:
1. Ickendel Ltd V Bewley Café Grafton Street: a lesson for landlords and tenants
2. Corbally V Medical Council: a lesson for regulators
3. ACC Bank V Kelly: a lesson for consumers and banks
Justice Peter Kelly, President of the High Court has written the foreword.

The booklet is in three parts.
1. Part one provides the evidence of the legal consequences of unclear communication in three court cases in Ireland.
2. Part two describes what plain English is and how it is gaining traction – from public demands for clear consumer contracts to the emphasis on plain language in the Central Bank of Ireland’s Consumer Protection Code.
3. Part three provides guidance on how to write in plain English, words and phrases to avoid, document design tips and other useful resources.

The booklet was launched by the National Adult Literacy Agency and Mason Hayes & Curran at their Plain English Awards in the Law Society of Ireland, Dublin in 2017. The awards were sponsored by MHC and are the second Plain English Awards ceremony to be held in Ireland.

Plain English Training 2017

22 March 2017, 9:30am to 3:30pm
Carmelite Centre, Aungier Street, Dublin 2

Register online for a course that will introduce you to plain English writing and design tips.

Cost 
€120 per person (€100 per person for community and voluntary organisations)

The training venue is wheelchair accessible.

Launch of Plain English Awards 2016

The Plain English Awards – sponsored by Mason Hayes & Curran – are a public pat on the back for plain English champions.

This year NALA is encouraging businesses and organisations from different sectors (Financial, Health, Regulatory and Public Sector) to send us documents that they think are outstanding examples of plain English. The deadline is 15 November and you can send your material online.

An independent panel of plain English experts will judge the entries and decide on the best and worst winners in each category.

The winners will get an internationally approved Plain English Mark. The worst will get some free Plain English training.

The awards are organised by the National Adult Literacy Agency (NALA) to promote the use of plain English in all public information.

Plain English Training – including tips for writing for the web

Wednesday 14 September

9.30am – 3.30pm

Venue: Carmelite Community Centre, 56 Aungier St, Dublin 2.

Ask yourself the following questions:
◾Do you want to ensure you are communicating as clearly and effectively as possible?
◾Are you sometimes frustrated answering the same questions because the information to customers is not clear enough?
◾Do you find it difficult to develop clear reports, policies, promotional, training or web materials?
◾Do you want to get quality training in how best to communicate, provided by leaders in plain English editing and training?

If you answered ‘yes’ to any of these questions, then this course is for you.

Cost

€120 per person (€100 per person if from the community and voluntary organisations). You can enrol online.

This venue is wheelchair accessible.

Plain English Training – including tips on writing for the web

Wednesday 22 June, 9.30am – 3.30pm

Venue: Carmelite Community Centre, 56 Aungier St, Dublin 2.

Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Do you want to ensure you are communicating as clearly and effectively as possible?
  • Are you sometimes frustrated answering the same questions because the information to customers is not clear enough?
  • Do you find it difficult to develop clear reports, policies, promotional, training or web materials?
  • Do you want to get quality training in how best to communicate, provided by leaders in plain English editing and training?

If you answered ‘yes’ to any of these questions, then this course is for you.

Cost

€120 per person (€100 per person if from the community and voluntary organisations). You can enrol online.

This venue will be wheelchair accessible.